Cire TRUDON

Steeped in history that dates back to King Louis XIV, Cire Trudon is the epitome of luxury when it comes to candles, fragrance and giftware. Lighting up the hallways and boudoirs of the monarchy, Cire Trudon’s flames flickered in both Versailles and the Imperial Court during Napoleon’s reign. Thanks to the Sun King and the Little General, this candle company managed to survive not only the French Revolution, but also the miracle of electricity and is still around today.

 
Cire Trudon candles

Cire Trudon candles

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History

In 1643, Claude Trudon became the owner of a boutique on the rue Saint-Honoré where he developed his activity as a grocer and candler. His candles were purchased to light parishes and homes. Thus, in the early days of Louis the 14th’s reign, Claude trudon created a manufacturing company that would make his family fortune.

PERFUMED STORIES

In 2007, the company took the name ‘‘Cire Trudon’’ and became a specialist in manufacturing perfumed candles. Today it enlists well-known ‘‘noses’’ to create perfumes for the stories it wishes to tell. Each candle is still dripped and made by hand, perpetuating a luxury manufacturing which helps perpetuates the skills of its founder, Claude Trudon.

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L’art du cirier

The wax

The wax formulas of the Trudon candles are the fruit of specific developments which are the source of its exceptional olfactory and burning qualities.

The Glass

Each glass is unique and hand-crafted in Tuscany. Their shape is inspired by champagne buckets.

The wick

The wicks are made of cotton. One can find many types of wicks, characterized by their weaving and their diameter.

The motto

Their Motto ‘‘Deo Regique Laborant.’’, which you can read on their emblem means: the bees work for God and the King.

The Emblem

The emblem is inspired by a bas relief found at the old Royal Wax Manufacture which used to belong to the Trduon family. Situated in Antony, near Paris, it now belongs to the church. Nowadays the domain hosts the nuns of the Saint-Joseph de Cluny congregation.